5 Best Andromeda Galaxy facts

Fact About Andromeda Galaxy

Andromeda Galaxy facts

Andromeda Galaxy facts: If it were possible to travel anywhere in the galaxy, the next step in our epic adventure would be visiting our nearest major galaxy, Andromeda. It is 2.5 million light-years from Earth. It is the most remote naked eye object you can see in the night sky, though dozens of minor galaxies lie closer to our Milky Way. The Andromeda Galaxy is the nearest big spiral galaxy to ours. It is the nearest major galaxy to the Milky Way and it gets its name from the area of the sky from which it appears, the constellation of Andromeda, Which become named after the Greek mythological princess Andromeda. Here are five fascinating facts about the Andromeda Galaxy:

Andromeda Galaxy Fact No. 1

Andromeda has 1 trillion suns. There are around 1 trillion suns in the Andromeda Galaxy compared to between 100 and 400 billion stars for our own Milky Way Galaxy. Not only does it have many more stars than the Milky Way, Andromeda is huge, with a diameter of around 220,000 light-years across, which is almost one and a half times longer than the Milky Way. Despite that, the mass of the Andromeda Galaxy is handiest 400 billion times that of our very own solar. The Milky Way is thought to be widely heavier, as it likely possesses more dark matter and dark energy than the Andromeda Galaxy.

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Andromeda Galaxy Fact No. 2

Andromeda appears six times the size of our moon from the northern hemisphere. The Andromeda Galaxy is best seen from August to February and in the southern hemisphere, it can be seen low on the northern horizon from October to December. The Andromeda Galaxy is best found when it is moderately dark outside because then it is very easy to spot. But it may come as a surprise to most people that the Andromeda Galaxy appears six times wider than the whole moon in the night sky.

To the naked eye, it appears as a cloud of faint light that is about the size of the moon. A decent pair of binoculars will show a much larger image of the galaxy. Using an 8-inch telescope, M31 presents a stunning sight, with its diffuse dust lanes stretching out from its bright center. If these vast spiral arms are included, the Andromeda Galaxy would cover around 20 degrees of sky, which is about 40 full moons.

Andromeda Galaxy Fact No. 3

Andromeda is full of black holes. As with all large galaxies, which include our personal Milky Way, the Andromeda Galaxy has a supermassive black hole at its center. In this case, with a mass of 100 million suns. The central region of the Andromeda Galaxy is full of black holes. The galaxy once had 9 known black holes, but that number went up to 35 in 2013 when astronomers found 26 new black holes in the galaxy, which is the largest haul of black hole candidates ever found in a galaxy that is not our own.

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Most of these new black holes have about 5 to 10 times the mass of our sun. Seven of the black holes were found within a thousand light years from the center of the galaxy. Astronomers anticipate to find many extra black holes in the Andromeda Galaxy inside the future.

Andromeda Galaxy Fact No. 4

In 2017, a pair of supermassive black holes were found. They are the nearest orbiting pair ever observed. The two could catastrophically collide in less than 350 years and merge as one massive black hole. The two are currently 0.01 light years apart, which is just a few hundred times the distance of the Earth from the sun. Not only is the number of black holes in the Andromeda Galaxy impressive, but the way they are moving is also impressive.

Andromeda Galaxy Fact No. 5

Andromeda and Milky Way will collide. Andromeda is going to collide with our galaxy in the distant future. At this very moment, our two galaxies are approaching each other at 60 to 87 miles per second. In approximately 4 billion years, the Milky Way is going to merge with Andromeda, possibly having a triple nucleus for a while, while the stars we are familiar with will also form new constellations. But eventually, the galactic collision will settle down, resulting in a new large elliptical galaxy.

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Of route, while galaxies come collectively close, you may assume there might be a variety of collisions. It seems logical that an entire bunch of little red dwarves, the most common stars in any galaxy, would combine to make many more large white suns like our own. But the truth is that the space between the stars is so vast that there will be no collisions at all. What will happen is that many stars will be flung off into deep space and become wandering star systems. But the vast majority will stay together and form a huge ball of stars.

Further Facts

5 Best Andromeda Galaxy facts

Andromeda was once thought to be a nebula. A nebula is a huge cloud of gas and it is the region where stars are born. Remote galaxies have often been mistaken for these large clouds. In 1924, astronomer Edwin Hubble discovered that the spiral nebula Andromeda was actually a galaxy and that the Milky Way was not the only galaxy in the universe.

Hubble found several stars in the Andromeda Galaxy, including cepheid variable stars. Cepheid variable stars vary from vibrant to dim and may be used to degree distance. He discovered how far away these stars were and that helped him calculate that the Andromeda Galaxy was 860,000 light years away, which is more than 8 times the distance of the farthest stars within the Milky Way.

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Andromeda Galaxy Facts

1. There are around 1 trillion suns in the Andromeda Galaxy compared to between 100 and 400 billion stars for our own Milky Way Galaxy.
2. Andromeda appears six times the size of our moon from the northern hemisphere.
3. Andromeda is full of black holes. As with all large galaxies, which include our personal Milky Way, the Andromeda Galaxy has a supermassive black hole at its center. In this case, with a mass of 100 million suns.
4. Andromeda is going to collide with our galaxy in the distant future. At this very moment, our two galaxies are approaching each other at 60 to 87 miles per second. In approximately 4 billion years, the Milky Way is going to merge with Andromeda.

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